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SEN Information Report

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At Arden Primary School we strive to support all children to enable them to achieve at school.

In order to do this, many steps are taken to support them through their learning journey.

Quality teaching is vital; however, for some children there are occasions when further additional support may be needed to help them achieve their targets.

A child with SEND is described as:

A child of compulsory school age has a learning difficulty or a disability if he or she:

Has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age, or

has a disability which prevents or hinders him or her from making use of educational facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream schools.

A child under compulsory school age has special educational needs if he or she is likely to fall within the definition in the paragraph above when they reach compulsory school age or would do so if special educational provision was not made for them (Section 20 Children and Families Act 2014).

The Special Needs Co-ordinator at Arden is:

Mrs Ruth Sumner

Roles and responsibilities of the Special Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO)

The SENCo is responsible for the operation of the Special Needs Policy and Co-ordinator of specific provision made to support individual children with SEND. The SENCo liaises with staff to monitor the pupil’s progress and plan further interventions where progress is slower than expected. The SENCo has regular contact with a wide range of external agencies that are able to give more specialised advice. If you have any concerns regarding SEND matters do not hesitate to contact the SENCo.

Roles and responsibilities of the Special Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO)

  • The SENCo is responsible for the operation of the Special Needs Policy and Co-ordinator of specific provision made to support individual children with SEND.
  • The SENCo liaises with staff to monitor the pupil’s progress and plan further interventions where progress is slower than expected.
  • The SENCo has regular contact with a wide range of external agencies that are able to give more specialised advice.

If you have any concerns regarding SEND matters do not hesitate to contact the SENCo.

The SENCo is responsible for the operation of the Special Needs Policy and Co-ordinator of specific provision made to support individual children with SEND. The SENCo liaises with staff to monitor the pupil’s progress and plan further interventions where progress is slower than expected. The SENCo has regular contact with a wide range of external agencies that are able to give more specialised advice. If you have any concerns regarding SEND matters do not hesitate to contact the SENCo.

Glossary of the most used SEND terms

ADD Attention Deficit Disorder
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder
ASD Autistic Spectrum Disorder
CAF Common Assessment Framework
CAMHS/HYMS Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service/Healthy Young Minds Stockport
CoP Code of Practice
CP Child protection
EBD/SEMH Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties/Social, Emotional and Mental Health Difficulties
EHCP Education Health and Care Plan
EAL English as an Additional Language
EP Educational Psychologist
FSM Free School Meals
HI Hearing Impairment
IBP/SSP/TLP  Individual Behaviour Plan/SEN Support Plan/Teaching and Learning Plan
KS Key Stage
LAC Looked After Child
LEA Local Education Authority
MLD Moderate Learning Difficulties
NC National Curriculum
OT Occupational Therapy
PCR Person Centred Review
PSP Pastoral Support programme
SALT Speech and Language Therapy
SEND Special Educational Needs and Disability
SENCo Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator
SpLD Specific Learning Difficulty
TAC Team Around the Child
VI Visual Impairment

Current SEND updates

What is Pupil Premium?

The Pupil premium was first introduced in April 2011 and is allocated to schools to work with pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years (known as EVER 6 FSM). Schools also receive funding for children who have been looked after and children of service personnel.

Why has it been introduced?

The Government believes that the Pupil Premium, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.

Who decides on how the money is to be spent?

In most cases the Pupil Premium is paid direct to schools, allocated to them for every pupil who receives free school meals. Schools decide how to use the funding, as they are best placed to assess what their pupils need.

How are schools accountable for the spending of Pupil Premium?

They are held accountable for the decisions they make through:

  • The performance tables which show the performance of disadvantaged pupils compared with their peers.
  • The new OFSTED inspection framework, under which inspectors focus on the attainment of pupil groups, in particular those who attract the Pupil Premium.

Children and Families Bill 2013

The Children and Families Bill takes forward the coalition Government’s commitments to improve services for vulnerable children and support families. It underpins wider reforms to ensure that all children and young people can succeed, no matter what their background. The Bill will reform the systems for adoption, looked after children, family justice and special educational needs.

The Government is transforming the system for children and young people with special educational needs (SEN), including those who are disabled, so that services consistently support the best outcomes for them. The Bill will extend the SEN system from 0-25, giving children, young people and their parents/carers greater control and choice in decisions and ensuring needs are properly met.

It takes forward the reform programme (Support and aspiration) by:

  • replacing statements and learning difficulty assessments with a new birth to 25 Education, Health and Care plan, extending rights and protections to young people in further education and training and offering families personal budgets so that they can have more control over the support they need;
  • improving cooperation between all the services that support children and their families and particularly requiring local authorities and health authorities to work together;
  • requiring local authorities to involve children, young people and parents in reviewing and developing provision for those with special educational needs and to publish ‘local offer’ of support

What is the local offer?

Stockport will set out, in one place,’ information about provision they expect to be available across education health and social care for children and young people in their area who have SEN or are disabled, including those who do not have Education, Health and Care(EHC) Plans. In setting out what they ‘expect to be available’, local authorities should include provision which they believe will actually be available’. (para 4.1, Code of Practice Jan 2015) http://www.sensupportstockport.uk/

What will it do?

It will provide clear, comprehensive, accessible and up to date information about the available provision and how to access it. It will also make provision more responsive to local needs and aspirations by directly involving disabled children and those with SEN and their parents, and disabled young people and those with SEN, and service providers in its development and review (para 4.2, Code of Practice Jan 2015).

Key principles of the local offer

The local offer should be:

  • collaborative
  • accessible
  • comprehensive
  • transparent

FAQ

A series of questions have been devised in consultation with the SENCo, Headteacher, SEN Governor and a Parent Forum. We feel these questions reflect any concerns and interests parents, carers and agencies may have. Here are the answers and more information about the school offer from Arden Primary. Should you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact the school office.

  • How does Arden Primary know when a child needs extra help?

    We know when pupils need help if:

    • Concerns are raised by Parents/Carers, teachers or the child
    • Limited progress is being made
    • There is a change in the pupil’s behaviour or progress
  • What should I do if I think my child has special educational needs?

    The class teacher is the initial point of contact for responding to parental concerns. If you have concerns then you may also contact Ruth Sumner who is the SENCo (Special Education Needs Co-ordinator).

  • How will I know how Arden Primary will support my child with SEND?

    Each pupil’s education programme will be planned by the class teacher. It will be differentiated accordingly to suit the pupil’s individual needs. This may include additional support by the teacher or a teaching assistant within the class. If a pupil has needs related to more specific areas of their education then he/she will receive intervention in a small focus group. This will be run by the teacher or by the teaching assistant and last a few weeks – usually half a term. Interventions are carefully planned and results inform us if sufficient progress has been made. Pupil progress meetings are held each term. This is a meeting where the class teacher meets with the Senior Leadership Team to discuss the progress of the pupils in their class. This is an opportunity to identify any potential barriers in order for further support to be planned. Occasionally a pupil may need more expert support from an outside agency eg Occupational Therapy, Learning Support, Speech and Language etc. The SENCo will refer, with your consent, and an assessment will be made. If appropriate, a programme of support will be provided for your child and you will receive a copy. The Governors of Arden Primary School are responsible for entrusting a named person – Miss N.Haddock (Headteacher) to monitor Safeguarding and Child Protection procedures. She is also responsible for the monitoring and correct administration of the Disclosure and Barring service procedures and the school’s Single Central Record. The Governors ensure that the school is as inclusive as possible and treats all children and staff in an equitable way. They also monitor and review the accessibility plan and all other statutory policies as defined by the DfE. The Governors’ Inclusion and Safeguarding Governor is Mr Phillip Wilkinson.

  • How will the curriculum be matched to my child’s needs?

    A child with special needs will have their work differentiated by the class teacher to enable them to access the curriculum more easily. The Class Teacher may direct Teaching Assistants (TA’s) to work with the pupil in a 1-1 or in a small focus group to target more specific needs. If a child has been identified as having a special need they will have specific targets and objectives set according to their need. These targets are monitored by the class teacher and reviewed during the year alongside the SENCo. If appropriate, specialist equipment may be given to a child with special needs to enable them to access the curriculum more easily. Examples of these are fidget toys, concentration cushions, slope boards, pencil grips, timers, chew toys and pop up barriers.

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